Author Archives: Brendon J. Brewer

About Brendon J. Brewer

I am a senior lecturer in the Department of Statistics at The University of Auckland. Any opinions expressed here are mine and are not endorsed by my employer.

Introducing ‘Brews’, and two cool things from the internet

A few short items… I’ve made a little web page for sharing results of analyses I do (mostly these will be posterior samples and marginal likelihood values). I’ll aim to put things up when they’re sufficiently mature and ‘finished’, in the … Continue reading

Posted in Inference, Personal | Leave a comment

Faculty positions with us!

Our department is going through a period where lots of our long-time faculty members are reaching retirement age, and we’re currently advertising for some new faculty to join us. The ads can be found at this address. Currently, there are two openings at … Continue reading

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Demand curves are basically CDFs

As my loyal reader knows, I’ve been trying to learn some econ, as I find it quite fascinating and continuous with several other interests. Anyway, last night I was on the phone to Jared, and mentioned a connection I’d noticed between a basic concept in microeconomics and one in statistics. I thought the connection was obvious, […]

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Posted in Economics | 2 Comments

Plausibility Theory Podcast, Episode 1: Keagan Brewer

I enjoy podcasts, so had a go at recording one. I hope you enjoy it.    

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A Rosenbrock challenge for MCMC folks…

Note: After I posted this the first time, I started to distrust my own results. I am confident the properties of the problem are probably something like what my figures show, but perhaps different in a couple of details. I … Continue reading

Posted in Computing, Inference | Leave a comment

A frequentist does his maths homework

Question 1: Solve the quadratic equation . Answer: The two solutions are given by the quadratic formula where , , and . Therefore, after some simplification, the two solutions are and . I don’t like much how there is an ambiguity … Continue reading

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Gains from trade versus(?) subjective wellbeing

This year I’ve been learning basic economics. It’s a cool subject. One interesting concept is “gains from trade”. The idea is that a person probably only participates in a trade if they think they’d benefit from it. If two parties … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Entropy, Inference | 3 Comments